Process & Strategy Solutions

Cynthia Kalina-Kaminsky by Cynthia Kalina-Kamin... @
Extraordinary events demand extraordinary performance from supply chains.

In today's world, responsiveness is key, but reliability makes responsiveness possible. How do you target 2 different goals with your supply chains?

You segment the supply chains.

In the case of a hurricane or other natural disaster, you contract differently for both segments.

The Reliable segment makes sure that the right stuff is in the right place at the right time in the right quantities.... This SCOR attribute is captured in Perfect Order Fulfillment metrics. Positioning is key now to be responsive later.

Once the disaster strikes, the responsive supply chain segments take over. The last mile logistics depend on adequate planning, optimized processes, and integrated people skills to make things flow correctly behind the scenes so that your supply chain performance receives kudos at the scene. Responsiveness is a SCOR attribute and is captured in a hierarchy of cycle time performance metrics.

You can think of it like postponement: you want the right stuff at your fingertips so that no matter when the demand comes in, you are ready.

>>>> Intrigued? Click here to learn more about SCOR and supply chain performance in today's FREE WEBINAR at 4 EST, Sept. 11. You've got the right stuff, now let's make it work for you and your customers. <<<<


key words and concepts: SCOR, webinar, performance, reliability, responsive, supply chain

Cynthia Kalina-Kaminsky consults with companies eager to increase their supply chain competitiveness and is presenting today's free webinar for Boston APICS at 4 EST.
Cynthia Kalina-Kaminsky by Cynthia Kalina-Kamin... @
- originally published August 29, 2017

It requires a lot of people to send up the Mars Rover or a space probe. It is never technology alone.

Once the rover lands, a lot of people are required to work with the technology to monitor performance, remotely fix performance glitches, interpret all the data coming back, and adjust the module's activity to focus on what is important.

It's a symbiotic relationship - people need technology and technology needs people in order to fully realize potential.

The same can be said for your digital supply chains.

How well you integrate people and automation will dictate your digital competitive success. I'm not talking about the chip in the head stuff but the collaborative way automation and people can coexist to provide best outcomes.

Unlocking the constraints to this collaboration will also avoid some of the not-so-great experiences that cost you revenue, time, and image. Here's one of my more cynical views on total automation. Please remember: I integrate technology and am not its foe.

Let's take a totally automated delivery scenario; the automated warehouse autonomously loads the driverless truck which proceeds along the most optimal route as chosen by the system. When the business' digital bandwidth is exceeded due to high volume of digital traffic, certain trucks stop in the middle of the highway and wait until the bandwidth is no longer exceeded. (Another angle is that the data coverage isn't exactly what is advertised and the truck no longer has a digital signal)

Stopped trucks are perfectly logical. Waiting in the middle of the highway for a signal is logical, however: not so safe.

What if we had a contract with a national chain of truck drivers? These drivers contract to be ready to go out to your truck at a moment's notice when a digital distress signal comes in. They physically drive the truck either to its next destination; or at least off the highway to a truck stop. They are the AAA of trucking. While a simplistic solution, it has a side benefit of providing business continuity.

To solve some of the problems you can think of concerning improper or incomplete integration people and digital tech, we must creatively innovate on number 3 below from HBR's article on digital competitiveness.

1. public-private partnerships on digital innovations;
2. better integration of automation, data, and new technologies into the legacy economy;
3. investments in reskilling workers and teaching students in schools the skills and thinking to thrive in a digital world;
4. improving access to capital and digital infrastructure and reducing the many inequities;
5. sensible regulations that keep pace with the transforming rules of competition and have a dynamic view of protecting
        consumers’ interests without stifling innovation; and
6. reimagining U.S. competitiveness in terms of its digital economy and international data flows and thinking beyond
        traditional manufacturing and trade of physical goods and services.

Identifying the need for these items to be integrated into our business strategies isn't enough.

The people and the technology must be integrated so closely that:

a) we stop complaining about our schools and host specific learning events with local children - whether in or out of a school setting - so that digital becomes second nature. A second nature that enables how we have to do business.

b) we stop complaining about lack of trained personnel and start finding/creating the exact training our digital-people integration requires. This is more complicated than just bringing in spreadsheet training. It requires close collaboration between the various functional areas, HR, and finance as well as knowledge of processes and business maturity levels to move forward. This is the very mix that forces us to be innovative

>>> Interested in learning how to pinpoint the exact mix of people, processes, and metrics to create the best digital supply chain performance? Join me for a 3-day Master Workshop on the SCOR framework. Click here to begin your integration. <<<<

c) we hire people who are open to ideas. There is no "one size fits all". There is no "this is how it has always been done, we don't need to change." There is no "I and people like me know best". We get the best possible mix of people and technology

d) we do not try to have technology take the place of personal insight and innovation. Or the opposite.

No amount of personal insight and innovation can outperform personal insight and innovation combined with data collection, data analysis, and decision making aided with digital tool sets.

Your experience may be most of the way to the competitive answer, but nuance counts. I've seen CEO's miss the mark when they rely only on gut feeling and miss the nuance.

Nuance is captured using a combination of personal insight and innovation with digital technologies that enable data collection, analysis, and synthesis

Decision making is improved, faster, and more reliable decisions are made.

Employing a framework such as SCOR allows you to outline exactly what is needed at each process as well as take care of how the process performance will be monitored. This lets you objectively track an early warning signal that indicates when a new level of maturity, and often a new level of digital - human interaction, is required.

Because you plan for this event in advance, you have people ready and trained when needed.

Because you are track business performance, changes are not made until they would show up in the performance metrics as a positive. The changes are targeted to exactly where in your supply chains you will receive the looked for improvement. You eliminate guessing and minimize opinion while employing human-digital integration for decision making.

One framework, multiple areas of simultaneous benefit simultaneously, and a more engaged workforce providing you with a competitive digital advantage.

>>> Interested in learning how to pinpoint the exact mix of people, processes, and metrics to create the best digital supply chain performance? Join me for a 3-day Master Workshop on the SCOR framework. Click here to begin your integration. <<<<

Key words and concepts: people, digital competitiveness, SCOR, supply chain, performance, process
Cynthia Kalina-Kaminsky by Cynthia Kalina-Kamin... @
- originally published on August 16, 2017

In a recent HBR article, Bhaskar Chakravorti, Ajay Bhalla, and Ravi Shankar Chaturvedi share research highlighting that the U.S. is on the verge of stalling out in its digital competitiveness.

Why?

Because the U.S.  has a high level of digital advancement accompanied by slowing momentum.

Not good for a country heavily investing in IoT, digital supply chains, and blockchain.

However, the article also highlights what will prevent stalling out: public policy leadership (quoted from the article):

• public-private partnerships on digital innovations;

• better integration of automation, data, and new technologies into the legacy economy;

• investments in reskilling workers and teaching students in schools the skills and thinking to thrive in a digital world;

• improving access to capital and digital infrastructure and reducing the many inequities;

• sensible regulations that keep pace with the transforming rules of competition and have a dynamic view of protecting
       consumers’ interests without stifling innovation; and

• reimagining U.S. competitiveness in terms of its digital economy and international data flows and thinking beyond
        traditional manufacturing and trade of physical goods and services.

Easy to write, but what about reality and actual implementation.

How can you keep all these strategic pieces moving, coordinated, and at the end of the day, creating performance results for your company?

This is where a framework such as SCOR comes into play.

While all can be worked with SCOR, let's take on the second bullet point.

How many of us are not interested in successful integration of automation, data, and new technologies into the legacy economy which includes our legacy systems? No one I know.

The trouble is, there are so many areas we'd like to move forward, but our legacy systems and current business thinking is holding us back. So, let's change the paradigm.

For our example, let's imagine being a consumer goods manufacturer.

Our mindset is usually focused on lowering operational costs. Good customer service is in there, but cost cutting is king.

Should it be?

What if we focused on asset management in our example supply chains - all of our assets. If we can move our products more efficiently through optimized supply chains, then our costs are automatically lower. What we need to do is figure out which of all the available supply chain segments will truly work to meet our performance requirements efficiently even though they may be located in different parts of the world.

Using the article's digital competitiveness map, we can choose segments based on a country's digital maturity. If we think of a supply chain as a train moving product down tracks (tracks being supply chain segments), then optimal supply chains require choosing which segment of the track should be used (ie: which source or delivery piece will work best). Instead of a single track, our supply chains will resemble train yards where tracks are switched to match country ability.

Sounds complex.

It is and it isn't.

If we optimize our processes and align our metrics with asset management performance, then our extended supply chain segments must optimize and align in the same manner. We choose them because of this alignment. Sourcing now includes finding suppliers that match our ultimate performance requirements - in this example: asset management. This means we may have more than one source for any given raw material, but we pull on a specific source when digital requirements dictate. Delivery also requires the same setup. Our supply chain is flexible.

<<<< If you find this interesting, during the first two days of the SCOR Master Workshop we cover the exact steps to design these supply chains in detail. Click here to master the framework used successfully by over 5000 companies.>>>>

What happens now?

You don't feel as if you are pushing a string because you have a focused, structured, and standardized methodology and philosophy that provides specific performance results you can see in both the financials and in the reduced stress levels within the company.

You get top and bottom line results from a unified framework.

You get top and bottom line results by matching tactical process detail to strategic performance.

Digital competitiveness isn't always about a new product.

For more mature countries like the U.S., it's about the innovation in application.

<<<< If you find this interesting, during the first two days of the SCOR Master Workshop we cover the exact steps to design these supply chains in detail. Click here to master the framework used successfully by over 5000 companies. >>>>

Key words and concepts: digital strategy, SCOR, supply chain, performance, application innovation
Cynthia Kalina-Kaminsky by Cynthia Kalina-Kamin... @
- originally published on May 4, 2017


The answer to that question is: no.

In taking a business view of the U.S. administration’s policies over the past several months, there is a strong bent on turning back the clock to a previous era.

Here’s what I’m seeing:

One:

Old industries that couldn’t or wouldn’t keep up with changing business strategies and global competition want paths cleared for them by eliminating regulations that will make it cheaper, but not easier or more effective, to compete in the global economy.

Why not more effective or easier to compete?

Because today’s customers expect more.

Whole sections of customer populations both in the U.S. and out of the U.S. expect protections for the environment and workers that are being or in danger of being pulled back. These customer populations have options as to what they buy and who they will buy from. They will signal with their feet if you use yesterday’s models for today’s purchases.

Two:

Attempts to remake the U.S. image into THE global power. Things have changed. Global supply now outstrips demand. Customers around the world continue to raise their expectations. Social media quickly captures and distributes unacceptable performance. Threats of tariffs have other countries looking at their options. Being country centric won’t change the fact that about 95% of the world’s consumers live outside the U.S. borders. It won’t change the fact that to get to many of the world’s consumers, you must have operations in the consumers’ countries. It won’t change the fact that there are very smart people who run companies and supply chains outside of the U.S. borders that can competently compete head to head with U.S. companies.

So what does all of the above mean?

It means that we must compete effectively and competently. Muscle, anger, and provocative posturing won’t change the need for effective and competent competitive offerings, but could make things worse. Much worse.

>>>Find the topics and how to overcome them engaging? Join me to learn how to keep moving supply chains forward in my SCOR Mastery training on how to achieve highly competitive supply chains that allow business to meet and beat the competition. Click here<<<

Three:

A lack of knowledge of what businesses really do today. Steve Mnuchin’s AI quote, “I think that is so far in the future. In terms of artificial intelligence taking over American jobs, I think we’re like so far away from that, that uh [it’s] not even on my radar screen. Far enough that it’s 50 or 100 more year[s]” illustrates amazing lack of understanding on two critical business fronts: the role of technology in business and the need for training to prepare our workforce to competently handle the changes already happening, including AI, in our businesses and supply chains.

Why is this important?

The new technologies, such as blockchain, have economic and transformative powers. If the government doesn’t stay current on technology, then where will the planning take place that establishes the boundary conditions in which technologies must safely operate for our economy? In presenting blockchain to university supply chain students recently, one asked how, if central banks’ influence is diminished, monetary policy and the growth of the monetary supply will be managed when cyber currencies are used. These are important questions and must be answered collaboratively by governments and their central banks. If governments persist in looking backwards, the planning won’t happen. Be assured, however, the technology will continue to move forward.

The other major issue present in the quote is the lack of understanding of how the workforce of tomorrow must be trained today (and in many cases, tomorrow is already here). With training dollars from anywhere and everywhere being reduced or eliminated and the Department of Labor’s budget being restricted, how will the U.S. be great again if it doesn’t prepare its workforce to successfully compete?

With all of these headwinds, what can we do?

We can create our own tailwinds.

How?

You must strategically determine how to align your companies, and all functional areas in it, to what your customers value. You’ll need to be very specific so that everyone understands the value offering in exactly the same way.

 Why?

Because everyone plays a part in making sure your customers are delighted to the extent they can’t think of anywhere else to go for business.

That means you may have to invest in targeted implementations of technology that will close your gaps to meeting your customer’s requirements.

That means you’ll have to develop training plans, using internal and external resources, to ready your workforce for change. Your current workforce knows your company, why waste talent and goodwill? Training today is readily available in many forms and formats. You, however, will need to provide the roadmap of how workers get from where they are to where you need them to be.

That means you’ll have to do business differently.

You can’t look back.

You must look forward.

You must accommodate today’s customers, not yesterday’s.

And that’s how we keep America and our competitive value as great as it always has been and moving forward.

>>>Join me to learn how to keep moving supply chains forward in my SCOR Mastery training on how to achieve highly competitive supply chains that allow business to meet and beat the competition. Click here. <<<

Key words and concepts: strategy, supply chain, supply chain management, competition, change, technology, global trade
Cynthia Kalina-Kaminsky by Cynthia Kalina-Kamin... @
- originally published on April 2, 2017

In a recent article by Pymnts.com, the high risks associated with health care’s current cyber security maturity levels were highlighted. They were not encouraging.

Is your cyber security a high risk too?

If you say no, are you sure?

A huge problem in any company is in knowing all the intersection points where cyber thieves can gain access to your data. If you don’t know all the access areas, you are vulnerable.

So what to do?

How to care for all of the sensitive data you have on your suppliers, supply chains, and customers?

First, you need to have visibility throughout your supply chains. This means that your performance metrics align with your strategy and your dashboards are set up to monitor that alignment.

It also means you must have designed and documented exactly what is being done where. Here’s where things usually fall apart.

Documentation is often considered too cumbersome, too time consuming, and too bureaucratic to bother with.

But that means you don’t know what is where. You don’t have transparent operations.

>>> Quick break - article continues below: Intrigued by this content? You'll be more intrigued and excited by this master training focused on achieving company-wide visibility. Join me for “SCOR Mastery: Aligning to protect your supply chain and company secrets”. SCOR (Supply Chain Operations Reference model) is used by Fortune 500 companies <<<

Getting transparency and visibility is where frameworks such as SCOR come into play.

Processes are aligned to customer requirements and specific metrics are embedded into the processes from the start by embedding IT into all supply chain project work from the beginning. Due to the close alignment, you get to “see” real time performance AND you know exactly where your IT is connected to the outside world and where vulnerabilities are located for your supply chains.

If you embed this same framework accountability into all your IT work to enable not only your supply chains, but all of the supporting functional area service, then you get the same understanding across your entire company. The hierarchy remains the same no matter where you are in the company. This allows for rapid cross-functional visibility of cyber areas of concern.

It allows all functional areas and all business units to communicate without having to interpret what is being said.

Everyone uses the same process & metric definitions to align to your strategic focus. If and when customization occurs, it is adopted to accommodate wide use around the entire company. This differs from often used specific uses in one area, and with tweaks, a specific use in another area, and on and on. All of which leads to a lack of visibility and alignment.

Due to this visibility and transparency, you are able to “see” where your weaknesses are located so that you can accurately target what needs to be done where right now.

Is work required to align and enable this remedy to your visibility woes?

Absolutely

But understand; hackers are already doing their work.

Are you?

>>>If you want to keep your supply chains organized, aligned, and with full visibility, join me for "SCOR Mastery: Aligning to protect your supply chain and company secrets. Click here to learn more. <<<

Key words and concepts: supply chain, supply chain management, change, SCOR, cyber security, health care, visibility, transparency, framework
Cynthia Kalina-Kaminsky by Cynthia Kalina-Kamin... @
- originally published March 30, 2017

Doing something monotonous jobs all day, like picking? Then maybe a robot will take over your job.

Do your customers not want to pay for non-value added work like moving material from here to there? Then maybe a robot will take over your job.

Do you worry about jobs that may cause OSHA injuries from repetitive work that has low or no value added in the customer’s eyes? Then maybe a robot will take over your job.

However, since the problems listed above are only part of a person’s job, robots may in fact work alongside people instead of replacing people. You do the value add work, the robot does the necessary, but non-value added work.

Ok, this is sounding better.

But where to place collaborative robot (co-bot) to enable customer value add?

Tougher question

Never fear. You and your SCOR framework are ready to leap into action.

Step-by-step you:

1) Determine what the customer group at the end of your supply chain values (performance attributes:
        cost, reliability, responsiveness, agility, asset management)

2) Align the processes to deliver performance on the attribute chosen

3) Figure out where the gaps are in your performance according to your customer requirements and your strategic plan
        (these should be closely aligned)

4) Fill gaps to provide the value. If you can provide customer value AND company benefit using a co-bot set up, go for it.
       This supports your Lean and TOC initiatives to eliminate waste and improve throughput

5) Monitor and control the performance further using supporting SCOR metrics

6) Repeat to enhance your other supply chains

Congratulations! You’ve just added huge competitive value to your company. You achieved alignment to the customer requirements. The end customer benefits from the value you provided. You get leaner. You have more throughput. You get a safer more cost effective work environment. And, your people get to add value, not just work a job.

>>> Quick break - article continues below: Intrigued by this content? You'll be more intrigued and excited by this master training even more. Join me for “SCOR-P Mastery: Adding value by integrating people and technology”. SCOR (Supply Chain Operations Reference model) is used by Fortune 500 companies <<<

Of course, if you don’t get the first step correct, none of the benefits are realized.

So back to the co-robots…

Did you know that collaborative robotic sales are increasing steadily?

The technology is here and possibly being used by your competitors.

Just take a look at Amazon’s videos on the use of their Kiva robots. Or read this MEP article on collaborative robot use.

Are you ready to answer your competitor’s challenge?

Are you ready to provide more, better, targeted customer value?

And don’t forget the people who will be no longer picking or doing those monotonous jobs – have you targeted where in your organization their talents and skills can be best used? SCOR quickly targets where your most valuable assets, your people, will bring you the most competitive value.

>>>Want more great insights and tools to use so that you can boost your revenue and make you the trusted company in your industry? Join me for “SCOR-P Mastery: Adding value by integrating people and technology”  <<<

Key words and concepts: supply chain, supply chain management, change, SCOR, co-bots, people, collaborative robotics, competitive value, value, transformation, processes, results, performance, business transformation, metrics, strategy, customer service
Cynthia Kalina-Kaminsky by Cynthia Kalina-Kamin... @
- originally published March 3, 2017

To gain your ideal customer’s business and retain it for the long term – you need to be able to figure out exactly what they want often before they even know themselves…. here’s how to crack the code and get started!

Don’t guess.

Don’t assume.

Don’t do what the other guy is doing.

Do some research – inside and outside your company.

Do some discussion – inside and outside your company.

Figure out the performance their customers expect from them. You have a lot of data on this already. Review:

• records to figure out why they expedited orders
• notes from complaints made to customer service
• your delivery and logistics personnel’s knowledge about what this customer expects.

Next take a look at what the customer is proclaiming to the world in marketing taglines, the strategy embedded in a 10k, and the promises being made on the website.

But don’t stop there.

You need to ask them directly. Face-to-face, even CEO-to-CEO if they are big enough. Tell them the insights you’ve gained and your understanding of their performance requirements of you.

They will be impressed at your work, amazed at your insights, and ready to talk in meaningful ways. And that means you need to have a standard, easy to understand, industry recognized set of performance attributes ready to discuss.

This conversation positions you and your company as the trusted leaders that they need to do business with.

• You buy more from those you trust
• You integrate more with companies you trust

This discussion also provides you with valuable data that you can take back to your company, embed into processes, and enhance the customer experience even further. To stay aligned and to keep the trust, your company will be using the same performance attributes you just discussed.

Those unstoppable attributes are:

1. Reliability
        The right part at the right place at the right time with the right quantity made to the right specifications…
         It’s what you capture in a contract. If you can’t provide it, then don’t promise it.

2. Responsiveness
        Reduce cycle times for ever faster service. This is the “Amazon” play.

3. Agility
        Know your capacity and that of your extended supply chain. Once you do, you can flexibly adjust as demand changes  
         without hurting your supply chain or yourself.

          How agile are you?

>>> Quick break - article continues below: Intrigued by this content? You'll be more intrigued and excited by this master training even more. Join me for “SCOR-P training: Master performance, win the market”. SCOR (Supply Chain Operations Reference model) is used by Fortune 500 companies <<<

4. Cost
        How efficiently are you using your cash? How does your cash-to-cash cycle stack up against your industry?
        Your competitors?
        Your goals?

5. Asset Management
        How efficiently are you using all that stuff you paid cash for? Are you tracking it so you really know?

To get started, pick your strategic performance attribute. Only one. This is the tie-breaker, the one that always wins if you have to decide between attributes, the one you tout loudly and clearly to your customers.

Second, embed this attribute focus in all of your processes. No exception. Alignment prevents promising one thing, measuring another, and expecting a third.

No longer will you bring in customers you can’t service in the way they want to be served.

Why?

Because you now match their expectations to the performance you deliver. And this is where your earlier insights and discussions come into play. You know who they are even better than they know themselves.

Remember, the narrower you focus, the more business you get. http://www.SCORtraining.com

And beautiful things happen when the supplier and the customer both know exactly what is wanted and each can state it in ways the other company understands the exact same way.

Great things like:

• Visibility
• Lower costs (without focusing on them)
• Our pick of outstanding companies for our supply chains
• Much lower employee stress
• No expediting
• Larger top lines
• Bigger bottom lines

How did this happen?

It happened because you know your focus, your expertise, and have embedded them into your processes so that you can achieve amazing results as shown in your performance metrics.

TA DA! You've just added huge competitive value to your company and impressed the high-level decision-makers who like, trust, and respect you already, but were beginning to have doubts.

Customers doubt no more.

Want more great insights and tools to boost your revenue as the trusted company in your industry? Join me for “SCOR-P training: Master Workshop to win the market”  <<<

Key words and concepts: supply chain, alignment, flexibility, agile, agility, responsiveness, reliable, cost, competitive value
Cynthia Kalina-Kaminsky by Cynthia Kalina-Kamin... @
Does this sound familiar?

In talking with a great sales coach who consistently gets results out of the sales teams he works with, he discussed  insights for significant top line revenue increase per sales person.   I saw a ticking time bomb.

When I mentioned it, he paid no attention.

If you’re willing to risk your business, you can ignore the ticking time bomb too.

If you want to diffuse that ticking time bomb, keep reading.

In the supply chains I help, whether manufacturing, distribution, or SaaS, one thing I can count on finding is finger pointing between sales and operations/supply chain. In truth, the blame is shared and can be fixed with a bit of work and commitment so that everyone is happy and the company does not explode.

First: stop overselling your capacity or capability to produce -  it’s setting the company up for failure.

Second: hold feet to the fire - when agreements on numbers are made – they aren’t optional.

Third: get your metrics working for you - and they need to be strategically aligned throughout the company

Commissions are based on selling stuff/services. If your metrics award selling more and more stuff and services without regard to the company’s ability to deliver, then a few things are going to happen: 1) every sales person will push to sell more stuff and services, 2) customers will get upset with terminally late delivery, possibly reduced quality due to expediting, and they’ll go to one of your many competitors, 3) supply chain/op’s will be blamed for not delivering and sales will be blamed for overselling (finger pointing and tension escalates), and 4) sales people will earn commissions on the excess stuff/services sold and will go out for more.

Now why would any company set itself up for failure like this?

It’s just a matter of time before the company's time bomb goes off.  

What to do?

Communicate, collaborate, and coordinate your sales and operational activity.

And why is it acceptable in firms that share sales and operational information to only sort of work the formal processes?

Partial integration creates a lot of busy work and doesn’t drive results. Stop doing this. Integrate fully, get real results.

Whether you call it communication, collaboration, coordination, sales and operations planning (S&OP), or anything else, it is essential to how your company survives and thrives. It deserves to be focused on and improved – especially in our fast paced, customer focused world.

So tell me, what are you doing about your ticking time bomb?

Key words and concepts: customers, sales, supply chain, supply chain management, alignment, processes, sales and operations planning, S&OP, communication, cooperation, collaboration, strategy, process, process improvement, planning

 Cynthia Kalina-Kaminsky, President

Join me:

For SCOR-P on April 19-21 in Greensboro, NC where we'll diffuse your ticking capacity vs. demand time bombs.

And then for “Stop Wasting Time and Money: Get the Explosive Results You Need and Your Customers Want”, June 14 at the EFT 3PL Summit and Chief Supply Chain Officers’ Forum 2017 in Chicago, IL. Use code CKK500 for a $500 discount.

I can be reached at info@ProcessStrategySolutions.com or through LinkedIn at www.LinkedIn.com/CynthiaKalinaKaminsky
Cynthia Kalina-Kaminsky by Cynthia Kalina-Kamin... @
Never make it difficult for customers to do business with your business!

I call this Cynthia’s 1st Rule of Business.

It’s amazing how many businesses refuse to follow it.

Case in point: last night there was an event by two non-profits that I paid to attend. I had plans to talk with several people I need to coordinate business with as well as to support the entities. Here’s where the problems began:

First: The address for the event was incorrect, so it took a while and much asking to find out what the correct address was and where the building was located.

Second: After driving 2 hours to the event, I spent an hour driving around looking for parking and the building. I never found parking, so I had to turn around and drive 2 hours back.

As seemingly insignificant as you may think these things were, they took 5 valuable hours way from my business work – and herein lies the main problem you may have with your customers (make sure you aren't making the same type of mistakes).

A little advanced planning would have secured parking areas (I’m ok with paying) and a little verification would have shown that the publicized address was incorrect (I wasn’t the only one looking for this place).

Instead, I wasted 5 very valuable hours that I need for my business.

5 hours I was happy to donate if  -  if   - the entities would have done their part.

They did not.

Your potential and existing customers think the same.

Don’t waste their time.

Don’t waste their good will.

Don’t waste your ability to do business with them.

Don’t skip the easy stuff and make those who are willing to pay you money become so irritated that they abandon your business.

Don’t assume that people have time to do the work you should have done.

Don’t assume people will forgive you.

About 69% of customers are looking to jump ship to your competitor. The world is oversupplied with product and services.

Customers will jump and will never look back.

Do the simple stuff.

Make customers happy to do business with you.

Earn your customer’s loyalty every day.

It’s not difficult.

It takes some time and effort.

Like Niké says: Just do it

Key words and concepts: customers, customer relationship, customer relationship management, business, business strategy, strategic execution

Dr. Cynthia Kalina-Kaminsky is the President of Process & Strategy Solutions and consults with mid-sized and large product and service businesses eager to increase revenue through innovative supply chain design, improvement, and management.

I am teaching SCOR-P on April 19-21 in Greensboro, NC. The course turbo charges your ability to align your performance to your customers’ requirements.

I am also holding the workshop “Stop Wasting Time and Money: Get the Explosive Results You Need and Your Customers Want”, June 14 at the EFT 3PL Summit and Chief Supply Chain Officers’ Forum 2017 in Chicago, IL.  

I can be reached at info@ProcessStrategySolutions.com or through LinkedIn at www.LinkedIn.com/CynthiaKalinaKaminsky
Cynthia Kalina-Kaminsky by Cynthia Kalina-Kamin... @
With everything in flux in supply chain, it’s been interesting trying to figure out the focus of this blog.

My decision: do 1 thing at a time and whenever possible, introduce items that may not be regularly seen but are important to know about for your global supply chains.

Here’s one you should definitely know about.

China’s One Belt One Road (OBOR)

Wrapping through and around southern Asia, east Africa, and into southern Europe is China’s proposed “belt” and “road” combination.

The “belt” includes road, rail, pipeline and infrastructure projects stretching from central China through Central Asia and into Russia and various European destinations.  

The “road” is a network of ports (think sea) and infrastructure projects extending through South and Southeast Asia to East Africa and the Mediterranean Sea.

The OBOR is part of the enhanced financial policy coordination desired by China to stretch across the Asian continent. The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank and the New Silk Road Fund (NSRF) are to play significant roles in enabling infrastructure projects to be carried out in the regions.

Other features are trade liberalization, people-to-people connectivity, and an Information Silk Road that is driven by market and industry needs. Multiple countries are involved.

As expected, there risks as well as infrastructure gains in this initiative.

What does this have to do with your supply chains?

Global supply chains need to move products agilely, responsively, and reliably. If new major infrastructure is built, what effect will it have on where you conduct business, or what new ports or networks you will need to use and interface with? Where will the clusters of industrial opportunity be? BTW: have you listened to Jack Ma of Alibaba on the One Belt, One Road lately? (You’ll have to find a YouTube video with translation if you don’t speak Chinese.)

While there are significant hurdles to be overcome to make the One Belt One Road (OBOR) a reality, the underlying global expansion is real and according to discussion at the World Economic Forum, this represents a change to the world’s financial and economic architecture. So again, what does this mean for your supply chains?

First, you need data.

If you don’t have the in house analysis power to dig into how trade may be changed in these regions, reach out to a college or university that has a department expertise in foreign policy or global trade or [type in the area you need to know about that connects into this initiative]. Google allows you to search for this type of research and the researchers involved. LinkedIn can also aid in your search for this expertise.

Second, you need analysis.

Don’t rush through this part. Uncover potential options on how the OBOR may play out. How will the different end results affect your supply chains given the research and data you’ve gathered? What options do you have based on most likely infrastructure build-out? What other geopolitical issues must be included in your analyses? What are the learning curves for new infrastructure as it comes online? How likely are major infrastructure projects to fail, or not achieve scale even if launched? How and where can you play in this new environment?

Third, conduct a risk analysis.

Having identified the affects, conduct the risk analysis on what impacts these items will have on your current supply chains. What is the risk to your current supply chain configuration? Do you need a backup plans for specific regions or supply chain segments? What are the risks to your current routes and supplier base? What are the financial implications?

Fourth, create an action plan and implement.

The great thing about outside opportunities and threats is that they force you to take a hard look at how you are conducting business. Where are the gaps between what you provide and what your customers expect now? How can you become more efficient while meeting customer demands now? How can you be more agile so that you can respond to the changes easily and calmly? Combine your answers to these questions with requirements from your above analysis. Your resulting action plan should make your business stronger overall and may just help get past some of the hurdles that others who plan less and change less can’t.

For whatever plan you have, use a phased in approach in your implementation plan. Implement pieces that are common over all potential realities. For example, as you monitor development and capabilities, phase in corresponding process improvements or technology enhancements that increase your service to your current customers in ways they recognize and desire as well as incrementally provide you with new capabilities needed for your future. A phased in, modular approach allows you to experience small wins as you ready for various options, makes change easier, and enables revenue results that will allow you to continue implementing change without just hoping for future payback.

In the end, even if the OBOR does not meet its ultimate goal, your business is a stronger competitor just for having analyzed it and having been proactive.

For more on this topic, click here. You can also find multiple videos from various countries and entities on YouTube when you search on OBOR.

Key words and concepts: supply chain, global trade, foreign policy, change management, risk analysis, infrastructure

Dr. Cynthia Kalina-Kaminsky is the President of Process & Strategy Solutions and consults with mid-sized and large businesses eager to increase revenue through innovative supply chain design, improvement, and management. She works mainly with executives and senior management that manufacture, procure, and/or deliver high tech and complex products in the commercial and/or government spaces. On the service chain side, she works with SaaS companies.

She is teaching a SCOR-P course on April 19-21 in Greensboro, NC. The course is provides a kick start to transform your supply chains by aligning your customer requirements and business activity across all units, enabling your processes, and integrating agility, responsiveness, and reliability into your extended, global supply chains.  

Cynthia can be reached at info@ProcessStrategySolutions.com or through LinkedIn at www.LinkedIn.com/CynthiaKalinaKaminsky

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